Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Computer repair self taught?


This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
13 replies to this topic

#1 scaramouch

scaramouch

    New Geek

  • Registered
  • 4 posts

Posted 03 September 2006 - 03:44 PM

Hi :D ,I want to teach myself how to fix computers,I,m currently half way through a book on computer repair,it contains hardware and software.I would like to know where to start as far as what computers to work on first, i.e.,older ones,the same with software,learn the older software first,I only know XP.Should I buy old computers and take them apart,and how would I get hands on experience with older operating systems.What would be the absolute starting point be after I finished my book.Thanks

#2 Dave@Bytes

Dave@Bytes

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 33,415 posts

Posted 03 September 2006 - 04:01 PM

New hardware, old hardware--there isn't much difference in the composition of a PC from five years ago.

It's good to build a PC from scratch. If you're not sure what to buy, you can go online and look for a barebones computer--which means you can get a mobo, CPU, memory and other components and put them together yourself.

You can comparision shop here http://pctechbytes.pgpartner.com/

Regarding Operating Systems...I would learn a 9.x Operating System (like Windows 98 and ME). XP is current and quite similar to Windows 2000 Pro.

You should also invest in tools like a small PC repair kit and a multimeter to check voltages. You can also find them in the link above.

Good luck.

#3 scaramouch

scaramouch

    New Geek

  • Registered
  • 4 posts

Posted 03 September 2006 - 04:15 PM

Gooday,I was wondering about the older hardware because of the configuration that involves jumpers and switches,I believe most of the configuration today is done automatically by plug and play,And PCI is easy to configure for the same reasons.I just wanted to cover all the bases by knowing the older systems,five years of back knowledge is that enough?

#4 Dave@Bytes

Dave@Bytes

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 33,415 posts

Posted 03 September 2006 - 04:26 PM

I almost never come across PCs that use anything before Windows 98 or the hardware ATX form factors.

Even with all of the posts on this message board, we don't get questions about that stuff.

But if you want to learn it, I'm sure you could get some hardware on Ebay.

#5 scaramouch

scaramouch

    New Geek

  • Registered
  • 4 posts

Posted 03 September 2006 - 04:31 PM

That was the best news I heard today,I'm having enough trouble with the new stuff,any ideas on how to learn the older operating systems in a hands on manner,I only have XP on my computer,I guess what I'm trying to say is how do I get these on my computer or another way.Thanks.

#6 Bobbo

Bobbo

    VIP

  • Registered
  • 1,308 posts

Posted 03 September 2006 - 05:01 PM

The key to learning about computers is having a lot of friends that own them but don't know anything about them. Once you can prove that you have the slightest bit of pc savvy, everyone with a problem will ask you to look at their computer. Using your friends pcs will teach you a lot.........as long as you give them theirs back in working order. :eek:

#7 Lazarus Laptops

Lazarus Laptops

    Junior Member

  • Registered
  • 42 posts

Posted 03 September 2006 - 05:05 PM

I'd pick up some p3s. Same models. It's not that bad of an investment and you can learn to tinker without much financial loss.

Bob

#8 scaramouch

scaramouch

    New Geek

  • Registered
  • 4 posts

Posted 03 September 2006 - 05:11 PM

Thanks to all, good information all around,catch up with you later,out.:D

#9 Dave@Bytes

Dave@Bytes

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 33,415 posts

Posted 03 September 2006 - 06:04 PM

If you really want to start getting silly, you can build a Windows 98SE system, and dual boot it with a linux distro like SUSE. Linux is a liitle more hardcore, and if you are able to plow your way through that, you'll be a better Windows guy.

#10 Big Al

Big Al

    VIP

  • Registered
  • 160 posts

Posted 04 September 2006 - 03:09 AM

The best way of learning is in the field. Just get stuck in trying to fix things. Use the internet and forums like this for help!

Good luck!

Regards,
Al

#11 Gseip

Gseip

    VIP

  • Registered
  • 649 posts

Posted 04 September 2006 - 06:04 PM

You may want to also try an older Mac, and learn Mac's OS. Then get cheap upgrades online and play with mac systems also.Find an older pc and add a second hard drive with a different operating system and play there too.
Good luck and keep in touch.
G

#12 brett304

brett304

    Junior Member

  • Registered
  • 26 posts

Posted 04 September 2006 - 07:11 PM

Maybe you should consider the option that you might be overanalysing here... I mean, yes there are definitely things you can do...And as everyone has suggested, hands on is one of the best ways... Definitely do suggest getting an older version of windows as you can activate them without jumping through microsoft hoops everytime... Definitely build, and read about etc... Also, you may want to find whatever old hardware you can put together....Just remember here that you should start barebones...No soundcards, no major things, just the basics... This is where the old version of windows will come in handy...

At the same time though, you are living in a new day... Sata drives no longer have jumpers... Alot of add on graphics cards are plug and play, etc... So the point is to ready yourself for what you want to do with computers... I mean, don't learn how to operate the worlds first computer when you'll probably never come into contact with it... (or at least don't spend much time doing so)...

Go through a lot of the walk through tutorials, understand the different hardwares and go from there...Setting up software is basic management and is usually self explanatory... Read the specs of certain hardware and learn how it applies to what your doing...Like the difference between AGP and PCI-e.... This kind of analysation will prove very useful in learning to build... One more thing that I hinted to earlier, definitely decide what you want to be able to do... Set your goals and work toward them...

#13 sandipgolani

sandipgolani

    New Geek

  • Registered
  • 1 posts

Posted 25 April 2007 - 03:59 AM

Hi, I am sandip golani a Chip-Level Engineer, Engaged in repairing of computer and paripherals since last 20 years. I am also imparting chip-level training.

If you have any problem related to computer hardware or chip level repair work feel free to mail me.

my website is

www.compudrivesystem.com

visit and mail me the feedback.

thanks

Sandip Golani

#14 Lazarus Laptops

Lazarus Laptops

    Junior Member

  • Registered
  • 42 posts

Posted 25 April 2007 - 01:50 PM

Holy smoke! is that in US dollars?

You folks over there will let a good steak walk by but ya want the first born for a little knowledge?

Joke