Jump to content




Photo
- - - - -

Acer Extensa 4420 DC Power Jack Help Needed


This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
12 replies to this topic

#1 kingmurphy

kingmurphy

    New Geek

  • Registered
  • 3 posts

Posted 03 December 2009 - 11:04 AM

I need to replace the DC power jack in my Acer Extensa 4420. Can anyone tell me how to access the adaptor for replacement?

#2 Technica

Technica

    VIP

  • Registered
  • 217 posts

Posted 04 December 2009 - 05:55 PM

The adaptor? Do you mean you need to buy a new power supply??

#3 kingmurphy

kingmurphy

    New Geek

  • Registered
  • 3 posts

Posted 07 December 2009 - 06:43 PM

No. The power supply is fine. I am replacing the single pin power adaptor on the right hand side of the laptop - where you plug the power supply into the laptop itself.

Any help on how to access this for replacement would be great!!

Jim

#4 pcpixi

pcpixi

    New Geek

  • Registered
  • 2 posts

Posted 07 December 2009 - 07:10 PM

I am also in the process of replacing the power jack on my Acer Extensa 4420 (apparently this was a manufacturing problem on this laptop from 2008).

I had a friend disassemble my computer and inform me I needed the new power jack. Now I am on my own and trying to install this, but I also have questions. I will share what I know so far...

There is a service manual that shows you how to disassemble the computer here: acer travelmate 4720-4320 extensa 4620-4220 (biwa) service manual sg_tm4720_4320_book_0724 [[factory repair maintenance]]

To access the power jack (which is a part of the motherboard) you pretty much have to completely disassemble the computer. The service manual should help with that.

My problem is "what's next!?!" I think you have to solder this piece into place, but I'm not sure. If possible I would like to NOT have to solder, I want to keep this as cheap as possible and do not have the tools.

Does anyone know more about this? Do I have to solder? Any good guides out there to help?

#5 PC_Repair_Man

PC_Repair_Man

    PCTechBytes Elite

  • Registered
  • 769 posts

Posted 07 December 2009 - 09:21 PM

pcpixi your only option is to desolder the old part out and solder the new part in. There is NO workaround in this situation. All you need is a cheap soldering iron, some solder, and some desoldering braid all of which may cost you $20 bucks.

#6 Technica

Technica

    VIP

  • Registered
  • 217 posts

Posted 08 December 2009 - 09:14 AM

No. The power supply is fine. I am replacing the single pin power adaptor on the right hand side of the laptop - where you plug the power supply into the laptop itself.

Any help on how to access this for replacement would be great!!

Jim


Ahh OK, when you said adaptor I thought you were refering to the power supply adaptor not the DC power jack as such.

I recommend what "pc repair man" says although I would suggest trying to get hold of a soldering iron with a reasonably large tip and at least 25/30watts or it may not get hot enough to heat the board contacts up around the socket. ;)

Edited by Technica, 08 December 2009 - 11:30 AM.


#7 kingmurphy

kingmurphy

    New Geek

  • Registered
  • 3 posts

Posted 08 December 2009 - 10:04 PM

the maual will surely help. not sure how comfortable I am with soldering, however once I get it apart I'll decide if I want to do it myself or not. Any tips on soldering???

#8 PC_Repair_Man

PC_Repair_Man

    PCTechBytes Elite

  • Registered
  • 769 posts

Posted 08 December 2009 - 10:38 PM

Soldering something that small and simple isn't that hard to do.

First off the main rule of soldering is you have to "tin" the tip of the soldering iron. This means once you get the soldering iron hot you use a small amount of the new solder and let it melt onto the very tip which makes the tip nice and shiny. This "tinning" the tip method makes your soldering iron and the solder have a perfect heat connection and the solder will start to melt instantaneosly on the parts that you are working with.

Here is a video on how to "tin" the tip.

How to Tin a Soldering Iron: How to Build Electronic Circuits | eHow.com

The next thing you need to know about is desoldering because you have to desolder the old part to get the new one in. Most technicians use a tool called a solder-sucker BUT for someone who is just doing one repair like you are doing I don't recommend investing in one, instead just buy a roll of desoldering braid. This braid looks like a small flat copper rope. What you do is lay the braid on top of the joint that you want to desolder and then apply the hot soldering iron tip on top of the braid. Once the solder begins to melt the braid will absorb the solder, almost like it sucks it up into the braid. This will take care of the old solder and if you do it right the old part will almost fall right out.

Here is a video of someone using desoldering braid.

YouTube - Desoldering 2

Finally you just stick the old part in, get you a tiny drop of solder to melt into the hole to get things goin and from the you just continue to melt solder until it looks just right. That part is the most simple and easy.

Here's another helpfull video.

YouTube - Fix it yourself, Fixing the charger's socket with soldering iron

#9 Technica

Technica

    VIP

  • Registered
  • 217 posts

Posted 09 December 2009 - 02:15 PM

A very good post above. ;)

....I just want to add it sometimes takes quite a few seconds until there is enough heat for the desoldering braid to get hot enough to soak the solder up so make sure you hold the slightly tinned tip over the braid for long enough. ;)

#10 pcpixi

pcpixi

    New Geek

  • Registered
  • 2 posts

Posted 04 January 2010 - 05:33 AM

I finally got all my soldering items together and I tried to desolder the power jack tonight... to no avail!

I am using desoldering braid. When I held the soldering iron to the desoldering braid over the joint I wanted to remove nothing happened! I held it for a good 10-15 seconds before the other end of the desoldering braid started to burn my fingers. Should I be waiting longer? I thought I might melt the plastic motherboard piece and I got worried.

Any good advice for me soldering masters? I watched the videos. They make it seem easier than my clumsy fingers are!

#11 Technica

Technica

    VIP

  • Registered
  • 217 posts

Posted 04 January 2010 - 05:51 AM

It sounds like you don't have a wide enough tip on the end or perhaps not a hot enough solding iron.

#12 Overmann

Overmann

    New Geek

  • Registered
  • 1 posts

Posted 16 January 2010 - 12:43 AM

Is a 60W Soldiering Iron enough?

#13 Technica

Technica

    VIP

  • Registered
  • 217 posts

Posted 16 January 2010 - 08:48 AM

That all depends on the heat it operates at, I have known good quality 30W irons to work much better then some basic 60W irons. I use a temperature controlled soldering station and usually use it at it's highest setting of 480C.